The Challenges of Investing and Financial Planning for Americans Abroad

John Richardson interviewed me for his video series on Retaining or Renouncing US citizenship:

Much of this information is also covered in the Investment Constraints series of blog posts and my paper “Investing with one hand tied behind your back”, available at SSRN.

Have you written your MP yet?

Following Karen’s recent Call to Action! post, we are starting to receive  positive feedback on our Open Letter – Extra-territorial Reach of US Tax Reform Legislation from our elected representatives here in Australia.  This campaign is well aligned with the core purpose of our group being  advocating for the Australian Government to renegotiate the under-pinning legacy tax treaties and intergovernmental agreements to provide a fair go for all Australians.

The Open Letter seeks to draw the Australian Government’s attention to an emerging harmful consequence of US extra-territorial taxation as part of US tax reform but it also serves as an opportunity for you to open a dialogue with your elected representatives about the pressing need for Australia to address the many deficiencies in the current Tax Treaty that disadvantage Australians with US ties.

We’ll share some of the positive feedback we received, but first, we want to again remind all of our members to please write your MP / Senators about this issue.   Presently, our follow-up survey suggests that only seven MPs have been contacted to-date, suggesting that only a small fraction of our membership have taken action.  Most Senators from NSW, QLD, SA and VIC have received at least one letter, making a total of 44 Senators who have been contacted. We have yet to hear from anyone in ACT, NT, TAS or WA who has contacted their representatives.  Without your active involvement, affecting positive change will be difficult.

Continue reading “Have you written your MP yet?”

Behind the Curtain – FOI Requests

 

 

 

 

 

One of the terrific things about living in a parliamentary democracy like Australia is that there are safeguards in place to facilitate transparency of the Australian Government and public services.  One powerful tool is the Freedom of Information Act, or FOI, which provides individuals or organisations with the right of access to documents held by many government agencies.  By law, most public authorities have to respond to an FOI request within 30 days. Their response will either contain the information requested, or give a valid legal reason why it must be kept confidential.  Note that the government agencies may levy charges for locating and making the information available, based on prescribed rates.

Here at Fix the Tax Treaty!, we’ve often wondered whether the Australian Government adequately considered the impacts on Individuals (vs businesses) when negotiating and entering into the Australia – US tax treaty agreements and the FATCA Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA).

We decided to find out!

Continue reading “Behind the Curtain – FOI Requests”

Plan to Succeed (Part II) – Strategy Roadmap & Action Plan

Clearly articulating our group’s vision, objectives and action plans is essential if we are to be effective in achieving our aims. Many of you will recall that the Steering Committee members (Karen Alpert, Caroline Day and myself) have long been working on a Strategy Roadmap document, as previous discussed in a number of blog posts:

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

A good advocacy plan will help our group decide where to spend time and effort to achieve our goals and assist us to be as effective as possible with our limited resources.  The plan will be a key reference document that is periodically updated as we progress towards achieving our goals.

I’m pleased to announce that we have completed a final draft of our Strategy Roadmap.  You can view it here.

Continue reading “Plan to Succeed (Part II) – Strategy Roadmap & Action Plan”

How do US Tax Rules Constrain the Investment Choices of US Taxpayers Living in Australia?

In the Facebook group last week, someone claimed that only the very wealthy are disadvantaged by the dual tax obligations imposed on US citizens and green card holders living in Australia. Certainly, for an Australian resident with only salary income, it is likely that foreign tax credits (FTC) or the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (FEIE) will completely eliminate any US tax liability. However, for anyone who is considering investing for the future or running their own business, there are many pitfalls and traps in US tax law that need to be carefully considered. It seems like almost anything “foreign” is treated punitively by US tax law, and these xenophobic rules make it difficult for middle class US taxpayers to save effectively while living outside the US.

Over the next few weeks, I will be covering the following areas where US taxpayers living in Australia need to be particularly careful:

  1. Superannuation
  2. Homeownership
  3. Real Estate
  4. Australian Managed Funds
  5. Australian Shares
  6. Business Ownership Structures
  7. Investing in the US
  8. Record keeping

This series (and everything on this website) is general information only. I am not a lawyer, tax professional, or financial planner, just someone who has learned about US tax and wants to pass on general knowledge. Many areas of tax law are interdependent, so changes in one area may have unintended consequences in another. You should consult a professional who can consider your own personal circumstances before taking any action. Continue reading “How do US Tax Rules Constrain the Investment Choices of US Taxpayers Living in Australia?”

Australia’s best investment pal?

The US Study Centre at the University of Sydney, with assistance from AmCham Australia, is producing a study on Australian investment in the US (and vice versa). While there are many factors that determine whether an Australian company will locate operations or marketing efforts in the US, the tax treatment of any Australian managers sent over to the US must be part of the equation. Unfortunately, I think most Aussies moving to the US for business are completely unaware of how the US tax system will see their existing Australian financial assets — until they’re already in the US tax system and it’s too late.
 
It would be great if USSC would include even just a page or paragraph on the way both the tax treaty and the xenophobic US tax code discourage movement of managers between the two countries.
 
AmCham has a blog post that reproduces the article from the Australian (and is not behind a paywall). At the bottom of the blog post (just above the comment box) is an email link. If you’re an Aussie who has relocated to the US for business and had to deal with these issues, please email AmCham and encourage them to include individual tax issues in their study.

It’s not ‘… a matter for them to pursue with the US’!

Back in 2014, we met with our federal MP who sent a letter on our behalf to the Assistant Treasurer asking about taxation of our superannuation accounts by the US. This is an extract of the response we received from then Acting Assistant Treasurer, Matthias Cormann:

Letter dated July 2014 from Acting Assistant Treasurer
Letter dated July 2014 from Acting Assistant Treasurer

I have a problem with this response.

Continue reading “It’s not ‘… a matter for them to pursue with the US’!”