Blog

Fixing the Transition Tax for Individual Shareholders

Individual shareholders of US Controlled Foreign Corporations face a difficult deadline on 15 December. That’s the last date to file a timely 2017 tax return (assuming all possible extensions have been granted). For those who feel they must comply with the §965 transition tax, this is the last date to make an election to spread the tax over eight years. We have been covering this tax provision at Fix The Tax Treaty since before the Tax Reform legislation was passed (list of posts). Comprehensive coverage of the transition tax is available in a series of posts by John Richardson over at www.citizenshipsolutions.ca. For affected shareholders, the transition tax can destroy the nest egg they have built up over a long career. The purpose of this post is to consider how this injustice can be fixed.

Continue reading “Fixing the Transition Tax for Individual Shareholders”

Explaining GILTI – Wrap-up

My last four posts were an attempt at a broad overview of the Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) provisions that were part of the US Tax Reform enacted in December 2017. I started with a discussion of a comment made on behalf of the Israeli Ministry of Finance. This comment is quite unusual because most countries refrain from commenting on domestic regulations in another country. Following on from that post, I explained the underlying rationale behind GILTI, the mechanics of GILTI for corporate US shareholders and how the rules differ for individual US shareholders. This post provides a high level summary to tie the series together. 

Continue reading “Explaining GILTI – Wrap-up”

Explaining GILTI – Individual Impact

In this series of blog posts I try to explain GILTI (Global Intangible Low Taxed Income) in simple terms. In the first post I discussed a public comment made on behalf of the Israeli Ministry of Finance on the recent proposed GILTI regulations. My second post explained the rationale behind GILTI. The third post talked about how GILTI was measured focusing on US domestic corporations, the target of these provisions in the first place. This post will look at how these rules, that were written for Apple and Google, play out for individuals owning small businesses in the “foreign” country where they live. For those who want to get into the detail, there’s a technical appendix on our wiki. Continue reading “Explaining GILTI – Individual Impact”

Explaining GILTI – Measurement

In this series of blog posts I try to explain GILTI (Global Intangible Low Taxed Income) in simple terms. In the first post I discussed a public comment made on behalf of the Israeli Ministry of Finance on the recent proposed GILTI regulations. My second post explained the rationale behind GILTI. In this post I’ll discuss how GILTI is measured in non-technical terms. For those of you who want to get into the detail, there’s a technical appendix on our wiki. This post will focus on the general rules applicable to Apple and Google and other US domestic corporations that are US Shareholders in Controlled Foreign Corporations (CFCs). In my next post I’ll discuss the differences that apply when the US Shareholder is not a domestic corporation. Continue reading “Explaining GILTI – Measurement”

Explaining GILTI – Rationale

In my last post I discussed a public comment made on behalf of the Israeli Ministry of Finance on the recent proposed GILTI regulations. GILTI is quite complex, and that post may have thrown some readers into the deep end. In this post I go back to the beginning and try to explain why the US Congress felt that the GILTI provision was an essential part of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). Subsequent posts will cover more detail about what GILTI actually measures and how the GILTI computations are supposed to work.

When Congress passed TCJA, it was hailed as major international tax reform that would make US multinationals more competitive with their international counterparts. The US corporate tax rate was reduced from 35% to 21% and with much fanfare, the US moved from taxing the worldwide income of corporations to a (not quite) territorial taxation system. Now that the bill has been signed and taxpayers, the IRS, and the tax compliance industry have had some time to study it, the reality doesn’t quite live up to the hype. For non-resident individual US taxpayers, the problem could be even worse! The transition/repatriation tax (§965) and GILTI (Global Intangible Low Taxed Income – §951A) have been drafted to apply to all US shareholders of Controlled Foreign Corporations (CFCs), not just the US domestic corporations that benefit from the modified territorial tax system. Once again, Congress has failed to consider the implications of their actions on non-resident US taxpayers. Continue reading “Explaining GILTI – Rationale”

Explaining GILTI

GILTI (Global Intangible Low Tax Income) is the gift that keeps on giving – claiming US tax jurisdiction over the income of corporations owned by US “persons” on an ongoing basis. While the transition tax was painful, it was a one-off. For calendar year taxpayers, GILTI will apply starting with the 2018 US tax return – so it’s actually been in place for almost 11 months now. But the IRS has only just issued some of the relevant regulations and there are many questions that remain unanswered. Comments on the first set of proposed regulations are due on 26 November, so I’m going to start by considering a comment submitted by Arnold&Porter on behalf of the Israeli Ministry of Finance. In subsequent posts I’ll go back and discuss the purpose of GILTI and whether the actual legislation does what it says.

Continue reading “Explaining GILTI”

Part 1: Our FOI Journey – Challenges & Pitfalls

Looking For a Needle in a Haystack… 

Those of you who follow our blogs might recall we commenced a Freedom of Information (FOI) campaign with both the ATO and Treasury a full year ago to develop a deeper understanding around the issues we face with an intent to use this information to inform future policies and actions (see Behind the Curtain – FOI Requests, Nov 2017).

In practice, exercising our Freedom of Information rights became a much more involved, complex and time consuming process than initially envisioned.  Along the way we learned a great deal about the FOI process and challenges in obtaining useful information.  Although the information we obtained wasn’t the insightful contextual documents we had hoped for, we still gained some information and insights along the way.

I’ve split this blog into two parts to keep the length down

  • Part 1 – Challenges and pitfalls – Our journey through the FOI process
  • Part 2 – What did we learn and what steps might we consider next?

Continue reading “Part 1: Our FOI Journey – Challenges & Pitfalls”

Information Session – Renounce or Retain US Citizenship?

What: Since the passage of FATCA in 2010 and Australia’s acquiescence in the form of the FATCA IGA (signed in 2014), an increasing number of US citizens resident in Australia have become aware of their US tax obligations. For many the solution has been to renounce US citizenship. This will be an informal and interactive presentation covering questions such as:

  • My bank asked for my US SSN? Does that mean I must file US tax returns?
  • What does filing US tax returns mean for my super? My Australian investments? Will I be double taxed?
  • Does filing both US and Australian taxes defeat the objectives of financial and retirement planning in Australia?
  • What is the transition tax? GILTI? Is it still viable for a US expat to own a small business in Australia?
  • Will the US ever fix these problems by joining the rest of the world in taxing based on residence rather than citizenship? What is this new “TTFI” that I have heard about?
  • How do I renounce/relinquish US citizenship? Do I have to pay an exit tax on my Australian assets?
  • How do I determine whether renunciation is right for me?
  • If I renounce what happens to my Social Security? My IRA or 401(k)?
  • How does renouncing US citizenship affect my ability to travel to the United States?

Who: This is a joint presentation by Karen Alpert and John Richardson.

Karen Alpert founded the website Let’s Fix the Australia/US Tax Treaty and its associated Facebook group. The purpose of the group is to lobby and educate the Australian government regarding the impact of extraterritorial US laws on Australian citizens and residents and the cost to Australia of surrendering its sovereignty in these matters. Karen has a Ph.D. (UQ, Finance) and lectures in Finance at the University of Queensland.

John Richardson is a Toronto citizenship lawyer, the co-chairman of The Alliance for the Defence of Canadian Sovereignty as well as the Alliance for the Defeat of Citizenship Taxation. He is a member of the ACA Taxation Advisory Panel. He holds the degrees of B.A., LL.B., and J.D. He is a member of the Massachusetts, New York and Ontario bars. His law practice focuses on “Solving the problems of U.S. citizenship” including relinquishing and the “Exit Tax”. He gives programs for expats (and Green Card holders) all across Canada and Europe. He writes extensively at citizenshipsolutions.ca.

Where/When: 7pm – 9:00 pm Thursday 25 October, 12 Payne St., Auchenflower QLD (Fibrecraft House)
Google Maps Link: https://goo.gl/maps/8vJKgfD1x5t

THIS SESSION IS OF A GENERAL NATURE. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO AND SHOULD NOT BE UNDERSTOOD TO OFFER LEGAL ADVICE OF ANY KIND.

Additional Sessions (John Richardson only)
  • October 31 – Auckland, New Zealand
  • November 1 – Sydney, Australia

For information see:

http://www.citizenshipsolutions.ca/2018/10/14/considering-renouncing-us-citizenship-expatriationlaw-information-sessions-fall-2018/

Brisbane Session:

pdf of Slides

video on Facebook

The Challenges of Investing and Financial Planning for Americans Abroad

John Richardson interviewed me for his video series on Retaining or Renouncing US citizenship:

Much of this information is also covered in the Investment Constraints series of blog posts and my paper “Investing with one hand tied behind your back”, available at SSRN.

FATCA Developments (part 2)

In my last post I summarised a report prepared for the Petitions Committee of the European Parliament about the application of FATCA in Europe including the effect of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this follow up post I discuss the context of this report and other recent developments and the implications of these European actions on those of us who live outside the EU.

Accidental Americans

By now most Americans Abroad will be familiar with the wide-reaching effects of FATCA. These effects vary widely. Those in countries with banks that were badly hit by the DOJ Swiss Bank prosecutions, are finding it very difficult to open more than the most basic non-interest bearing bank account. Long term expats who were unaware of their US filing obligations or the more esoteric “foreign” provisions in the US tax code are finding that they have structured their financial life in ways that are toxic when US tax rules are applied. And with the recent tax reform, it has only gotten worse. Perhaps the worst situation is that faced by “Accidental Americans” whose connection to the US is tenuous at best.

In the past year, one of the more active fronts in the FATCA “wars” has been in France with the formation of L’Association des Américains Accidentels (AAA). This group has been generating media attention and actively lobbying the French government to come to their aid, culminating in the unanimous passage of a resolution by the French Senate inviting the government to take action to support French citizens caught up in the FATCA nightmare. This latest development hasn’t been picked up by the English-language media, but has been covered in French. (Anglophones, Google Translate is your friend!)

While all of this action has been building up in France, J.R., a French citizen and Accidental American, submitted his petition to the European Parliament, resulting in the report described in my last post, and a new oral question to the European Commission from the Petitions Committee.

Possible EU Action

The Petitions Committee will be voting at their June meeting on a resolution to be put to a Plenary session of European Parliament in July. The original draft of the resolution can be found here, with proposed amendments here. Many of the recommendations of Prof. Garbarino’s report have found their way into this resolution.  The first action paragraph added by the amendments to the resolution says it all:

-1. Calls on Member States and the Commission to ensure that the fundamental rights of all Citizens, in particular the Accidental Americans, are ensured, especially the right to a private and family life, the right to privacy and the principle of non-discrimination, as laid down in the Charter of fundamental rights of the European Union and in the European Convention of Human Rights

Additional paragraphs ask the Commission and Member States to

  • ensure that legal residents are not discriminated against when it comes to financial services;
  • ensure that EU data protection laws are followed and amend IGAs if necessary to ensure compliance with GDPR;
  • prepare a full impact statement on the impact of FATCA and CBT on EU residents and citizens;
  • noting the lack of reciprocity in the FATCA IGAs, calls on Member states to suspend the IGAs (or at least reporting on all but US citizens residing in the US) until reciprocity is achieved.

IF this resolution passes (the vote in the Petitions Committee is scheduled for 19 June, with a vote in the Plenary session in July), that doesn’t mean immediate action. Expect some foot-dragging by the Commission and Member States. However, due to the new GDPR, something will need to be done before the next data transmission in September.

Effect on FATCA worldwide

It is my hope that these developments will cause the IRS and Congress to consider the impact of FATCA on Americans abroad relative to the (minimal) potential revenue stream from tax residents of other countries who can offset most, if not all of their potential US tax liability with a credit for taxes paid to their home country. These are not the tax evaders FATCA was aimed at, but they are the main victims of a global stop and frisk program to locate, tax and penalise non-resident US citizens. Of course, expats have been hoping along these lines since 2010.

However, with GDPR there is at least some hope that EU member states (or the EU collectively) will be able to re-negotiate the FATCA IGAs. Any concession that EU member states are able to win from the IRS will be welcome, and can be used by other countries to win similar concessions. While Article 7 of the Model 1A IGA calls for consistency, its applicability in this instance will depend on exactly how the EU member states negotiate and draft any concessions. Article 7 says that IGA partners will receive the benefit of any more favourable terms with regard to potential penalties on local financial institutions and due diligence requirements, but not with regard to the actual reporting requirements. But, if EU Member States gain the concession that they no longer have to report on their own legal residents, I would expect other G-20 nations to ask for the same. Then there’s the matter of Article 10, which calls for the parties to revisit the agreement by the end of 2016 with regard to reciprocity. I have yet to find evidence that any partner jurisdiction has requested such a review.

Of course, any change in FATCA reporting requirements will not override US law. In the absence of an adoption of residence based taxation by the US, those with US assets or who plan on returning to the US will be exposed to US tax on non-resident citizens. However, CBT was unenforceable with respect to US citizens without any US assets prior to FATCA (and is still largely unenforceable) because the IRS has very limited power to collect from assets held outside the US. FATCA is really a data privacy/protection issue because under FATCA the IRS has a better idea of who might have a filing obligation (not who owes tax), and some non-US banks are assisting the IRS by insisting on proof of US tax compliance. Here’s hoping that the current push for greater data protection, as exemplified by GDPR, will have global effects when it comes to sending sensitive financial data on a country’s own citizens and residents across international borders.